1. 08:27 23rd May 2014

    Notes: 2

    Feministas socialistas (¿y radicales?) mexicanas sobre el cuerpo, la reproducción y la sexualidad de las mujeres

    "No, señores, no estamos enfermas, nos preparamos para gestar, tenemos cambios, movimientos liberadores en nuestro cuerpo. Podemos danzar, hacer el amor, pensar. Y la menopausia no es un fin sino un principio. Seguimos siendo mujeres. Nuestros deseos permanecen intactos, y sin el riesgo de embarazo. ¡Ah!, y no hay mujeres frígidas, sino hombres incompetentes. ¡Y qué mentira más gigantesca eso del parto sin dolor!"

    Rosa María Roffiel, Prólogo en Eli Bartra et al., La Revuelta: reflexiones, testimonios y reportajes de mujeres en México, 1975-1983

     
  2. "Los adultos quieren centrar en la longitud del pelo el sexo o la decencia". 

En Elena Poniatowska, La noche de Tlatelolco

    "Los adultos quieren centrar en la longitud del pelo el sexo o la decencia".

    En Elena Poniatowska, La noche de Tlatelolco

     
  3. 17:51 3rd May 2014

    Notes: 3

    Gender: Yer ‘doing’ it

    Gender: Yer ‘doing’ it

     
  4. 11:04 1st May 2014

    Notes: 8

    ¿Qué quiere decir que el género sea performativo? Una explicación en 3 minutos por Judith Butler.

     
  5. 09:27 16th Apr 2014

    Notes: 1

    What is seen as degrading by one viewer may in fact not be so seen by another, much in the same way that one person’s erotica is another’s pornography.
    — "Statement of Dr. Judith Becker and Ellen Levine" en Attorney General’s Commission on Pornography, Final Report (Meese Report), 1986.
     
  6. 15:30 27th Mar 2014

    Notes: 2

    A democratic morality should judge sexual acts by the way partners treat one another, the level of mutual consideration, the presence or absence of coercion, and the quantity and quality of the pleasures they provide. Whether sex acts are gay or straight, coupled or in groups, naked or in underwear, commercial or free, with or without video should not be ethical concerns.
    It is difficult to develop a pluralistic sexual ethics without a concept of benign sexual variation. Variation is a fundamental property of all life, from the simplest biological organisms to the most complex human social formations.
    — Gayle S. Rubin, Thinking Sex: Notes for a Radical Theory of the Politics of Sexuality
     
  7. 10:00

    Notes: 2

    The belly’s hunger gives no clues as to the complexities of cuisine.
    — Gayle S. Rubin, Thinking Sex: Notes for a Radical Theory of the Politics of Sexuality
     
  8. 14:15 26th Mar 2014

    Notes: 9

    This culture always treats sex with suspicion. It construes and judges almost any sexual practice in terms of its worst possible expression. Sex is presumed guilty until proven innocent. Virtually all erotic behavior is considered bad unless a specific reason to exempt it has been established. The most acceptable excuses are marriage, reproduction, and love. Sometimes scientific curiosity, aesthetic experience, or a long-term intimate relationship may serve. But the exercise of erotic capacity, intelligence, curiosity, or creativity all require pretexts that are unnecessary for other pleasures, such as the enjoyment of food, fiction, or astronomy.
    — Gayle S. Rubin, Thinking Sex: Notes for a Radical Theory of the Politics of Sexuality
     
  9. In addition to sexual essentialism, there are at least five other ideological formations whose grip on sexual thought is so strong that to fail to discuss them is to remain enmeshed within them. These are sex negativity, the fallacy of misplaced scale, the hierarchical valuation of sex acts, the domino theory of sexual peril, and the lack of a concept of benign sexual variation.
    — Gayle S. Rubin, Thinking Sex: Notes for a Radical Theory of the Politics of Sexuality
     
  10. 13:35

    Notes: 14

    Sexuality is as much a human product as are diets, methods of transportation, systems of etiquette, forms of labor, types of entertainment, processes of production, and modes of oppression. Once sex is understood in terms of social analysis and historical understanding, a more realistic politics of sexbecomes possible. One may then think of sexual politics in terms of such phenomena as populations, neighborhoods, settlement patterns, migration, urban conflict, epidemiology, and police technology. These are more fruitful categories of thought than the more traditional ones of sin, disease, neurosis, pathology, decadence, pollution, or the decline and fall of empires.
    — Gayle S. Rubin, Thinking Sex: Notes for a Radical Theory of the Politics of Sexuality