1. It is generally accepted that Western patriarchy has been much softened by the concepts of courtly and romantic love. While this is certainly true, such influence has also been vastly overestimated. In comparison with the candor of ‘machismo’ or oriental behavior, one realizes how much of a concession traditional chivalrous behavior represents-a sporting kind of reparation to allow the subordinate female certain means of saving face. While a palliative to the injustice of woman’s social position, chivalry is also a technique for disguising it. One must acknowledge that the chivalrous stance is a game the master group plays in elevating its subject to pedestal level. Historians of courtly love stress the fact that the raptures of the poets had no effect upon the legal or economic standing of women, and very little upon their social status. As the sociologist Hugo Beigel has observed, both the courtly and romantic versions of love are ‘grants’ which the male concedes out of his total powers. Both have had the effect of obscuring the patriarchal character of Western culture and in their general tendency to attribute impossible virtues to women, have ended by confining them in a narrow and often remarkably con scribing sphere of behavior. It was a Victorian habit, for example, to insist the female assume the function of serving as the male’s conscience and living the lot of goodness he found tedious but felt someone ought to do anyway.

    The concept of romantic love affords a means of emotional manipulation which the male is free to exploit, since love is the only circumstance in which the female is (ideologically) pardoned for sexual activity. And convictions of romantic love are convenient for both parties since this is often the only condition in which the female can overcome the far more powerful conditioning she has received toward sexual inhibition. Romantic love also obscures the realities of female status and the burden of economic dependency. As to ‘chivalry’, such gallant gesture as still resides in the middle classes has degenerated to a tired ritualism, which scarcely serves to mask the status situation of the present.

    — Kate Millett, Sexual Politics
     
  2. The function of class or ethnic mores in patriarchy is largely a matter of how overtly displayed or how loudly enunciated the general ethic of masculine supremacy allows itself to become. Here one is confronted by what appears to be a paradox: while in the lower social strata, the male is more likely to claim authority on the strength of his sex rank alone, he is actually obliged more often to share power with women of his class who are economically productive; whereas in the middle and upper classes, there is less tendency to assert a blunt patriarchal dominance, as men who enjoy such status have more power in any case.
    — Kate Millett, Sexual Politics (en la nota al pie aparece como referencia William J. Goode, The Family, 1964)
     
  3. Robert J. Stoller, Sex and Gender (1968), citado en Kate Millett, Sexual Politics (1969)

    Robert J. Stoller, Sex and Gender (1968), citado en Kate Millett, Sexual Politics (1969)

     
  4. 08:27 23rd May 2014

    Notes: 2

    Feministas socialistas (¿y radicales?) mexicanas sobre el cuerpo, la reproducción y la sexualidad de las mujeres

    "No, señores, no estamos enfermas, nos preparamos para gestar, tenemos cambios, movimientos liberadores en nuestro cuerpo. Podemos danzar, hacer el amor, pensar. Y la menopausia no es un fin sino un principio. Seguimos siendo mujeres. Nuestros deseos permanecen intactos, y sin el riesgo de embarazo. ¡Ah!, y no hay mujeres frígidas, sino hombres incompetentes. ¡Y qué mentira más gigantesca eso del parto sin dolor!"

    Rosa María Roffiel, Prólogo en Eli Bartra et al., La Revuelta: reflexiones, testimonios y reportajes de mujeres en México, 1975-1983

     
  5. "Los adultos quieren centrar en la longitud del pelo el sexo o la decencia". 

En Elena Poniatowska, La noche de Tlatelolco

    "Los adultos quieren centrar en la longitud del pelo el sexo o la decencia".

    En Elena Poniatowska, La noche de Tlatelolco

     
  6. 17:51 3rd May 2014

    Notes: 3

    Gender: Yer ‘doing’ it

    Gender: Yer ‘doing’ it

     
  7. 11:04 1st May 2014

    Notes: 8

    ¿Qué quiere decir que el género sea performativo? Una explicación en 3 minutos por Judith Butler.

     
  8. 09:27 16th Apr 2014

    Notes: 1

    What is seen as degrading by one viewer may in fact not be so seen by another, much in the same way that one person’s erotica is another’s pornography.
    — "Statement of Dr. Judith Becker and Ellen Levine" en Attorney General’s Commission on Pornography, Final Report (Meese Report), 1986.
     
  9. 15:30 27th Mar 2014

    Notes: 2

    A democratic morality should judge sexual acts by the way partners treat one another, the level of mutual consideration, the presence or absence of coercion, and the quantity and quality of the pleasures they provide. Whether sex acts are gay or straight, coupled or in groups, naked or in underwear, commercial or free, with or without video should not be ethical concerns.
    It is difficult to develop a pluralistic sexual ethics without a concept of benign sexual variation. Variation is a fundamental property of all life, from the simplest biological organisms to the most complex human social formations.
    — Gayle S. Rubin, Thinking Sex: Notes for a Radical Theory of the Politics of Sexuality
     
  10. 10:00

    Notes: 2

    The belly’s hunger gives no clues as to the complexities of cuisine.
    — Gayle S. Rubin, Thinking Sex: Notes for a Radical Theory of the Politics of Sexuality